Occupational exposures at electronic scrap recycling facilities

Asher TobinIn The News, Solid Waste Recycling

A worker in protective gloves in a warehouse scraps electronic parts for usable material.

(NIOSH Science Blog) Go Green! Recycle! We have all heard the call to be more environmentally conscious. However, not everyone is aware of the many health and safety hazards facing employees who handle the recycling of electronics. Many recycled electronics can contain hazardous materials such as lead, cadmium and other toxic metals. In 2011, the U.S. e-scrap recycling industry contributed approximately $20.6 billion to the U.S. economy, compared with less than $1 billion in 2002 [ISRI 2014]. The ‘e-scrap’ recycling industry is also called ‘e-waste’ or ‘e-cycle.’ This industry sector generated about 45,000 direct jobs in 2011, up from 6,000 employees in 2002, and recycled more than 4.4 million metric tons of materials in 2010 [ISRI 2014]. To better document the hazards, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has completed exposure evaluations at several electronics recycling facilities and conducted a survey of electronics recycling facilities across the United States.

To read more visit NIOSH

NIOSH HHE Electronic Scrap Recycling 2013-0130-3226

Plus check out these amazing YouTube videos deployed by NIOSH!

(NIOSH Science Blog) Go Green! Recycle! We have all heard the call to be more environmentally conscious. However, not everyone is aware of the many health and safety hazards facing employees who handle the recycling of electronics. Many recycled electronics can contain hazardous materials such as lead, cadmium and other toxic metals. In 2011, the U.S. e-scrap recycling industry contributed approximately $20.6 billion to the U.S. economy, compared with less than $1 billion in 2002 [ISRI 2014]. The ‘e-scrap’ recycling industry is also called ‘e-waste’ or ‘e-cycle.’ This industry sector generated about 45,000 direct jobs in 2011, up from 6,000 employees in 2002, and recycled more than 4.4 million metric tons of materials in 2010 [ISRI 2014]. To better document the hazards, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has completed exposure evaluations at several electronics recycling facilities and conducted a survey of electronics recycling facilities across the United States.

To read more visit NIOSH

NIOSH HHE Electronic Scrap Recycling 2013-0130-3226

Plus check out these amazing YouTube videos deployed by NIOSH!